×
Create a new article
Write your page title here:
We currently have 6,749 articles on Polandball Wiki. Type your article name above or create one of the articles listed here!



    Polandball Wiki

    Peter I Islandball

    Peter I Islandball has a weird name is a volcanic island near Antarctica-icon.png Antarcticaball owned by Norway-icon.png Norwayball.

    Peter I Island is one of Norwayball's two territorial claims in Antarcticaball, the other being Queen Maud Land. Peter I Island is the only claim within 90°W and 150°W and is also the only claim which is not a sector. Being south of 60°S, the island is subject to the Antarctic Treaty. The treaty ensures free access to the island for any scientific investigation, and states that it can be used only for peaceful purposes. Norwayball, Australia-icon.pngAustraliaball, France-icon.png Franceball, New Zealand-icon.png New Zealandball and the UK-icon.png UKball have all mutually recognized each other's claims in Antarctica.

    Norwegian administration of the island is handled by the Polar Affairs Department of the Ministry of Justice and Public Security, located in Oslo-icon.png Osloball. The annexation of the island is regulated by the Dependency Act of 24 March 1933. It establishes that Norwegian criminal law, private law and procedural law applies to the island, in addition to other laws that explicitly state they are valid on the island. It further establishes that all land belongs to the state, and prohibits the storage and detonation of nuclear products.

    Since 5 May 1995, Norwegian law has required all Norwegian activity in Antarctica, including Peter I Island, to follow international environmental law for Antarctica. All Norwegian citizens who plan activities on Peter I Island must therefore report to the Norwegian Polar Institute, who may deny any non-conforming activity. All people visiting the island must follow laws regarding protection of nature, treatment of waste, pollution and insurance for search and rescue operations.


    History

    The first sighting of Peter I Island was made on 21 October 1821 by Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen's expedition, who commanded the ships Vostok and Mirny under the Russian flag. He named the island for Tsar Peter I the Great of the Russian-Empire-icon.png Russian Empireball. Drift ice made it impossible for Bellinghausen to come nearer than 25 kilometers (16 mi) from the island. The Norwegian whale-ship owner Lars Christensen financed several expeditions to Antarctica-icon.png the Antarctic, in part for research and in part to claim land for Norway-icon.png Norwayball. The latter was motivated by the UK-icon.png British taxation of whaling stations in the Antarctic, and Christensen hoped to be able to establish stations on Norwegian territory to gain better privileges and so at least the taxes went to his home country. The first expedition to land on the island was the Christensen-financed second Norvegia expedition, led by Nils Larsen and Ola Olstad. They landed on 2 February 1929 and claimed the island for Norway. Larsen attempted to land again in 1931, but was hindered by pack ice. On 6 March 1931, a Norwegian royal proclamation declared the island under Norwegian sovereignty and on 23 March 1933 the island was declared a dependency.

    The next landing occurred on 10 February 1948 by Larsen's ship Brategg. Biological, geological and hydrographic surveys underwent for three days, before the pack ice forced the expedition to leave. The expedition built a hut and placed a copy of the document of occupation from 1929 inside. On 23 June 1961, Peter I Island became subject to the Antarctic Treaty, after Norway's signing of the treaty in 1959. Since then, there have been several landings on the island by various nations for scientific investigations, as well as a limited number of ships that have successfully landed tourists on the island.

    In 1987, the Norwegian Polar Institute sent five scientists to spend eleven days on the island. The main focuses were aerial photography and topographical measurements to allow an accurate map of the island to be produced. The second important area was marine biological investigations, although also geological, biological and other surveys were conducted. The team also built an automatic weather station. Three DX-peditions have been sent to the island, in 1987, 1994 and 2006.

    How to draw

    Peter I Island is drawn with a proposed flag.

    Gallery


    VE
    Norway-icon.png Børkdom Disney's Frozen Kingdom of Alan Walker Norway: Øil Øil and more ØIL!!! Norway-icon.png
    Counties Agder-icon.png AgderballInnlandet-icon.png InnlandetballMøre og Romsdal-icon.png Møre og RomsdalballNordland-icon.png NordlandballOslo-icon.png OsloballRogaland-icon.png RogalandballTroms og Finnmark-icon.png Troms og FinnmarkballNord-Trøndelag-icon.png TrøndelagballVestfold og Telemark-icon.png Vestfold og TelemarkballVestland-icon.png VestlandballViken-icon.png Vikenball
    Other Svalbard-icon.png SvalbardballJan Mayen-icon.png Jan MayenballSami-icon.png SamiballPeter I Island-icon.png Queen Maud LandballPeter I Island-icon.png Peter I IslandballBouvet Island-icon.png Bouvet Islandball
    Former entities 2-icon.png Migrants from South (PreHistoric Europeans)Norwegian-Empire-icon.png Medieval NorwayballKalmar Union-icon.png Kalmar UnionballDenmark-icon.png Denmark-NorwayballSecond Kingdom of Norway-icon.png Norwayball (1814)Sweden-Norway-icon.png Sweden-NorwayballNazi Norway-icon.png Nazi Norwayball


    Cookies help us deliver our services. By using our services, you agree to our use of cookies.

    Recent changes

  • Agjunaka • 11 minutes ago
  • Realjanx • 1 hour ago
  • AngelCM • 1 hour ago
  • AngelCM • 1 hour ago
  • Cookies help us deliver our services. By using our services, you agree to our use of cookies.